CRN Launches ‘4 Things to Know’ Video Series

New initiative explains complex dietary supplement industry topics; is intended to help non-industry audiences; hosted by expert CRN staffers


WASHINGTON —The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the leading trade association for the dietary supplement and functional food industry, today announced the launch of a new video series, “4 Things to Know.”

The new initiative explains complex dietary supplement industry topics and is intended to help non-industry audiences. The series is hosted by expert CRN staffers.

“Industry issues can get complicated quickly,” said Brian Wommack, CRN’s Senior Vice President of Communication. “The new series drills down to the basics using short, digestible videos to help a broader range of audiences understand how industry issues affect them.”

The videos allow industry stakeholders to communicate a baseline level of information to their audiences—such as consumers, legislators and staff, media contacts, and others who would benefit from a concise explanation of what they need to know.

The videos are hosted by CRN staff members, experts in their fields with deep knowledge into scientific, regulatory, and legal aspects of dietary supplements.

CRN has released two videos in the series, most recently on probiotic dietary supplements with CRN Senior Vice President, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, Andrea Wong, Ph.D. The video is part of CRN’s ongoing effort to educate stakeholders about the intricacies of probiotics and how these live organisms differ from other dietary supplements.

The first video, on age restrictions for dietary supplements with CRN President & CEO Steve Mister, is part of CRN’s opposition to proposed state legislation that limits access to sports nutrition and weight management products by age.

“Stakeholders supporting proposals on age restrictions for dietary supplements may not realize that these products are already well-regulated federally. Additional restrictions might actually increase risks for young people,” said Wommack. “CRN’s short video addresses that concern and suggests what might be more effective in keeping youth—and all supplement users—safe.”

Future topics in the series will include third-party certification of supplements, mandatory product listing, sports nutrition supplements, supplement use for nutritional shortfalls, and more. To view CRN’s “4 Things” video series, visit www.crnusa.org/4things.

Note to Editor: The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), founded in 1973, is a Washington, D.C.-based trade association representing 180+ dietary supplement and functional food manufacturers, ingredient suppliers, and companies providing services to those manufacturers and suppliers. In addition to complying with a host of federal and state regulations governing dietary supplements and food in the areas of manufacturing, marketing, quality control and safety, our manufacturer and supplier members also agree to adhere to additional voluntary guidelines as well as to CRN’s Code of Ethics. Visit www.crnusa.org. Follow us on Twitter @CRN_Supplements and LinkedIn.